Foodie Fun: Chicken Tetrazzini Self-Date

Tonight, I decided to woo myself. Every now and then I get this urge to have a self-date. It helps to keep things interesting. Wouldn’t want what is arguably the most important relationship in my life to get stale after all.

So, I put on Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos conducted by Benjamin Britten and performed by the English Chamber Orchestra. It’s a new record. Well, new to me. It was released in 1981. But I just bought it this week at an antique store in Bethany called the Rink.

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That’s not a dark figure lurking by my balcony door, it’s a coat to block the draft from the huge crack because the door isn’t set right.

They had an enormous vinyl selection and I walked out with seven new records: two April Wine, Abba, a Christmas album, Orion, The Passion of Paris, and Bach. I’m thrilled with all of them.

But enough about music for the moment; on to the recipe.

This recipe came from my trusty 2006 edition of the Betty Crocker cookbook. I really want to try more things from it because it has yet to let me down. Sometime this week I plan to try making the pecan pie with crust from scratch.

Although the recipe is six servings, I decided to halve it, which always means I end up doing some guessing on measurements. Below are my guesses.

Chicken Tetrazzini

Servings: 3?

Jen Servings: 4

Things to Use

  • A few ounces of spaghetti
  • 2 or 3 tbsp of butter
  • 1/8 cup of flour (give or take a bit)
  • salt and pepper
  • basil
  • ½ cup chicken broth
  • ½ cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 tbsp sherry
  • 1 chicken breast (cooked and cubed)
  • 1 (4 oz) can mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup shredded parmesan

Things to Do

  1. Cook spaghetti, broken into thirds (ish)
  2. Realize the recipe says cooked chicken and that yours is raw. Grab tiny skillet and brown it over medium heat with some salt and pepper. Remove to plate and cover with paper towel because you heard somewhere that was a good thing to do.
  3. Preheat oven to 350. There was no sense in doing it earlier when it would have been ready way before you needed it. No point in wasting electricity.
  4. Melt 2 tbsp of butter in tiny skillet. Realize it’s supposed to be on low and quickly lower the temp.
  5. Stir in flour, salt and pepper. See that the recipe says it should become smooth and bubbly. See that yours is clumpy. Add more butter.
  6. Remove from heat to stir in chicken broth and heavy whipping cream. Decide that a whisk would be far better for this job than a wooden spoon. Stir continuously and bring to a boil.
  7. Add a couple dashes of dried basil because you can’t believe that anything is good without basil.
  8. Boil and stir for one minute. Add mixture to spaghetti, chicken, and mushrooms in a larger pan. Forget that you are halving the recipe and put in two tbsp of sherry. Hope things will be fine.
  9. Mix well and dump in ungreased baking dish. Sprinkle top with parmesan.
  10. Listen to classical vinyl and drink $4 wine while congratulating yourself on being such a classy lady as the food bakes for 30 minutes.

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I love when my additions/screw ups make things taste awesome. That’s why I share my method with you in all its detail in the hopes that you might be able to replicate my success.

Although one helpful hint is in order here: go easy on the salt. Like, really easy on the salt. My giant salt cylinder has a broken spout, so I have no idea how much sodium chloride was poured into this meal, but even for me, a huge fan of NaCl, it was a bit much. Other than that, a truly beautiful repas.

Happy cooking!

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